Endless Blue – Week 90.2 – Flotsam: The Shape of Homeseas   2 comments

Oceanography

 The Shape of Homeseas

No map can illustrate the shape of nations perfectly, short of creating a globe.  Flattening out a sphere onto a rectangular space results in a warping of shapes near the poles.  But on Elqua, the problem is magnified by depth.

Nations as we know them are mostly sea level to about one kilometer higher.  On Elqua, the homeseas are essentially inverted: the land lowers instead of rises.  However, the habitable land area under the water reaches five times that downward, and the further down you swim, the harder it is to survive.  This means the Fluid Nations are more like bowls than plates.

Further muddying the situation is the medium: water.  Water absorbs light much faster than air.  This means, if you extend the borders of a homesea directly upward, most of the contents of the “bowl” are a featureless, horizonless blue.  Areas like this cannot be inhabited easily (floating islands like Atlantica might be used to accomplish it).

The final problem is the shallow waters that line the borders of the homeseas are incredibly dangerous areas to live in.  The waters are so shallow a piscean would have to crawl flat against the sand to stay underwater.  With the predator aberrations that populate the surface world in such numbers, these areas of sea are completely ill suited for habitation.  As a result, all homeseas relegate these expanses as “no Mer’s seas”, a neutral area where indigenous life can thrive without the worry of piscean encroachment.

With this mind, while looking at the map of the Known World might seem like the Fluid Nations are larger than the continents we have in real life, those areas are mostly composed of uninhabitable expanses of water.

2 responses to “Endless Blue – Week 90.2 – Flotsam: The Shape of Homeseas

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  1. Pingback: Endless Blue – Week 92 – Merrshaulk, the Covetous Collector | Endless Blue

  2. Pingback: Endless Blue – Week 111- Pleione Trench and the Mud Daubers | Endless Blue

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